Sculpture
Home ] Carving ] Signs ] Pattern Making ] Turning ] Restoration ] National Archives ] Bagpipes & Bellows ] [ Sculpture ] Bellamy Eagles ]

 

I do not often stray from having good plans, drawings and designs in front of me before beginning a project. Almost all of this paperwork comes from architects and designers who know their business much better than I. However, there have been a very few times where I have gone off that path and this page will serve to document the results. 

 

Six foot long, 200 pound fero-cement frog.  c.1976. 

 

This is the story

In 1976 I had a doctor who was blessed with great, big "Marty Feldman" type eyes. He married a woman who had two teenage daughters and before long the "frog eyes" jokes started. He brought home frog toys, frog pictures and frog statues. Pretty much any frog item he could find he brought home. So one day he says to me: "I want a frog to end all frogs. I want a frog so big that I will never have to bring home another frog statue." So, I made this frog for him. I was 26 at the time and never had a minute of art training - no drawing lessons, no sculpting lessons, nothing to do with art! Although I was doing a bit of carving, I was mostly working on wooden boats. Doing "art" seemed to me to be a good way not to make money. 

Looking at this creature now I find myself liking it a lot more than I did right after I made it. The front legs are a bit stiff but the rest of him looks pretty good, to my eye. It is the only thing I have ever made using this method.   

 

 

Frog_wire_pattern_1976.jpg (16929 bytes) Frog_matrix_1_1976.jpg (82245 bytes) Frog_matrix_1976.jpg (54691 bytes) Frog_left_side_1976.jpg (20303 bytes) Frog_front_1976.jpg (29821 bytes)

 

First: This is the wire pattern I made in an attempt to visualize the proposed frog. 
Next two: Welded steel framework. Over this framework, three layers of  1/4"X1/4" galvanized steel wire was formed.
Last two: The cement has been pushed into the wire and sculpted into the frog. 

 

 

Frog_painted_1976.jpg (31019 bytes) Frog_cowboy_1976.jpg (42935 bytes) Frog_legs_2003.jpg (55123 bytes) Frog_left_side_2003.jpg (46779 bytes) Frog_right_side_2003.jpg (60501 bytes)

 

First: After the cement cured, I took the frog to a taxidermist. He painted it and did a  great job!
Second: Frog cowboy - 1976
Next three: These show how he looked in 2003. Almost all of the paint has worn off but he has developed a great patina!

 

 

Frog_back_2003.jpg (87630 bytes) Frog_cowboy_2003.jpg (85364 bytes)

 

First: Frog's back. The most life-like view, in my opinion. 
Last picture: Frog cowboy - 2003 

 

BigBurlBowlCloser.jpg (48744 bytes) BigBurlBowlGrain3.jpg (55619 bytes) BigBurlBowlGrain.jpg (52962 bytes) BigBurlBowlGrain2.jpg (45330 bytes) BigBurlBowlOutside.jpg (61353 bytes)

 

BigBurlBowlFar.jpg (25366 bytes) BigBurlBowlClose.jpg (35552 bytes)

 

Seven pictures of a nice maple burl bowl that was started in the fall of 2005 and completed in July of 2006.  About 18"across the top at the widest point. 

 

 

SnakeOnSlate2.jpg (33634 bytes) SnakeOnSlate3.jpg (33775 bytes) SnakeOnSlate4.jpg (34624 bytes) SnakeOnSlate5.jpg (36311 bytes) SlateAcanthus.jpg (61347 bytes)

 

First three: Sculpture carved from a pine burl. A bowl was taken out of the center and the rest worked down into the shape you see with draw knives and spoke shaves and an electric chain saw. Finish is two coats of raw tung oil cut with Japan dryer and sanded with 0000 steel wool between the first and after the last coat. Finished off with a couple of coats of good car wax for a very, very soft feel.  
Last: 2 1/2" X 5 1/2" X 1" acanthus study. This was hand carved in Monson (Maine) black slate.  I cut this out of a much larger piece to give to my eye surgeon after two operations last summer to restore my depth perception. A very interesting experience. The study was for a hand carved headstone for my parents' grave.  

 

Phone1.jpg (29988 bytes) Phone2.jpg (26246 bytes)
 
This 18" telephone handset was made to put in a broken pediment over an entry  doorway in a Verizon office and it is the first sculpture I have done using urethane foam. Made from solid brass, the base is 7/16" thick and the spaghetti cord is 3/8" in diameter. The end of the "cord" is threaded into the base and silver soldered. The coil was made by heating up the rod and twisting it around a piece of round rod. The "cord" travels up the center of the handle to the bottom of the ear piece. It follows the curve so the handset will not rotate on it. The paint I used was developed for the yacht industry and I applied the four coats with a brush. It is the highest gloss and hardest surface paint I have ever used.  

 

Home ] Carving ] Signs ] Pattern Making ] Turning ] Restoration ] National Archives ] Bagpipes & Bellows ] [ Sculpture ] Bellamy Eagles ]


Top of Page